•  Shiveluch (Orogenesis)

    Shiveluch (Orogenesis)

  •  Shiveluch (Tetonics)

    Shiveluch (Tetonics)

  •  Shiveluch (Avacha)

    Shiveluch (Avacha)

  •  Shiveluch (Kamchatka)

    Shiveluch (Kamchatka)

  •  Shiveluch (Okhotsk)

    Shiveluch (Okhotsk)

  •  Shiveluch (Lithosphere)

    Shiveluch (Lithosphere)

  •  Shiveluch (Fire and Ice)

    Shiveluch (Fire and Ice)

  •  Shiveluch (Plume)

    Shiveluch (Plume)

  •  Shiveluch (Astenoshpere)

    Shiveluch (Astenoshpere)

  •  Shivluch (Subduction)

    Shivluch (Subduction)

Songs for Relinquishing the Earth


Shiveluch volcano eruption 2017

volcano normal

We will have to bend to nature's force.

These paintings are inspired by the writings of Jan Zwicky and Carlo Rovelli. Jan Zwicky is a Canadian philosopher who has written lyric poetry such as
Songs for Relinquishing the Earth, as well as essays, including her latest book, Learning How to Die. This tiny book addresses the huge philosphical issues facing our species as we approach climate catastrophy. Both she and the theoretical physicist Carlo Rovelli have come to the conclusion that our civilization will not survive, perhaps not even our species. As Rovelli points out, all of the nearest relatives of our species are already extinct. As we face our own demise, we must come to terms with ourselves, and our actions. In the words of Jan Zwicky, "I think it’s time for us to get our souls in order. I can’t imagine trying to die with any degree of dignity without acknowledging what I’ve done. It’s truth and reconciliation of the self with the planet.“
This photo of the Shiveluch volcano eruption is from the NASA website, always a place of inspiration for me. It captures the beauty of destruction, the immense tetonic forces that move our planet and create chaotic moments of evolution. And it underlines the invincablity of our planet. Nature will outast us. Without seeing this truth, we can't see through the darkness to the beauty that is before us now.

All paintings in the Shiveluch series are 90x130 cm, oil on aluminum panel.
image/photo credit NASA/METI/AIST Japan Space Systems, and U.S./ Japan ASTER Science team